Funeral Foods

Food is always a universal key item in any occasion and especially at funerals. Every culture has there own particular kind of comfort food that is made during the grieving process. Here are five recipes from five different cultures and feel free to try to make them and see what you think!:

Funeral Potatoes (Idaho and Utah):

This recipe is well known in Idaho and Utah among the Mormon community. This super decadent food is filled with butter, cheese, hash browns and corn flakes in a pan and cooked in the oven.  This is usually served as a side dish for not just funerals but for other holidays. I will most likely try to make this side dish in the near future.

Irish Wake Cake (Ireland):

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This is serve usually during the wake in Irish cultures. It is like a mixture of a pound cake and a fruit cake because sometimes fruit is added depending on your preference. Link to recipe is below:

Irish Wake Cake

Pan de Muertos (Mexico):

This sweet bread is usually made in Mexico for the Day of the Dead (November 1-2nd). The shape of the bread various because it really depends on who makes it. Sometimes it comes in the shape of regular buns with a criss cross bone shaped pattern on top of the bun and sometimes in comes in shapes of people and animals:

pan-de-muertos-2

This food is typically eaten  at the gravestone of the departed with that particular love ones favorite food.

Funeral Pie (Pennsylvania):

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This recipe is well known in the Amish Community and is also known as Rosina Pie in German. The ingredients are usually items that are usually found in a typical household and are not that expensive. The pie was usually made a day or two before the actual meal for the funeral that day due to the ingredients shelf life. This desert was a good desert to bring to someone who family member who passed away.

Link for the recipe is below:

Funeral Pie

Kyuri uma and nasu ushi (Japan):

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During the Obon (Buddist memorial service)- it is believe that the love ones who pasted away return to the Obon as spirits. Families of the deceased place offerings at their Buddhist alters in their homes. One kind of offering is made out of a carved cucumber that is in the shape of a horse and then it is left at the recently deceased’s gravestone so they are able to return to the afterlife.

 

Until Next time!

Source:

https://www.funeralguide.co.uk/blog/traditional-funeral-food

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